Tuesday, September 1, 2015
 


“a glaring example of the commoditization of the art world.”

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This is what happens when an artist doesn’t perform to the tunes of an art dealer.

Los Angeles dealer and artist agent Stefan Simchowitz and Dublin dealer Jonathan Ellis King have filed suit against the Ghanaian artist Ibrahim Mahama, alleging that he breached a contract between them by, among other things, declaring hundreds of signed works inauthentic, potentially costing the dealers $4.45 million in work they own by him.

Via Artnews.

 

Now Accepting Applications for the 2016 Art & Law Program

Applications for the 2016 Art & Law Program are now being accepted. 

Deadline for applications:  October 19, 2015

Going on its 7th year, The Program seeks qualified, open-minded and self-motivated individuals with an interest in the philosophical relationship between art and law. In particular, The Program welcomes candidates who are open to controversial dialogue and who seek to challenge their respective practices and ideological positions. Please note that the Program is not for everyone. Applicants are encouraged to study and fully understand the mission of the Program and speak with alumni regarding the Program’s structure and expectations of its participants.

Art & Law Program seminar on contemporary art, copyright and moral rights.

Art & Law Program seminar on contemporary art, copyright and moral rights.

In 2016, the Program will cover law and critical theory, tangible and intangible property, technology, drones, international territoriality and jurisdiction, economic and moral rights, the legal system and legal interpretation, and the U.S. Supreme Court. Participants are expected to review dense legal material.

The Program does not focus on traditional and conventional critical theory, but rather investigates how the philosophy and practice of law disturbs the critical theory establishment and creates a new space and discourse for aesthetic and intellectual practices. Nor is the goal of the program to provide a practical overview of legal issues for artists, but instead to investigate broader legal and juridical infrastructures, which may or may not relate to art and art practice – that is for participants to decide.

Application instructions may be viewed hereApplications are due October 19, 2015.

The Program runs from January 19 - April 19, 2016 and will meet at the Triple Canopy space in Brooklyn, New York. Please reserve Monday and Wednesday nights, 6-9pm, for the seminar meetings. The Program concludes with a retreat at Denniston Hill artist residency. The Program welcomes alum and art historian/curator, Lauren van Haaften-Schick as Associate Director of the Program.

The Art & Law Program is an independent organization based out of New York City. For more information on The Program, please view the Program description. Program and application inquiries should be sent via e-mail to: sms@artlawoffice.com

 

Germany Stops Collector From Selling Artwork

WDR Headquarters in Cologne, Germany. Photo: Raimond Spekking via Wikimedia Commons

WDR Headquarters in Cologne, Germany.
Photo: Raimond Spekking via Wikimedia Commons

German public broadcaster Westdeutscher Rundfunk (WDR), which controversially put some of its art collection up for sale to pay off debts, has been banned from exporting two paintings by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Max Beckmann.

More here.

 

No, state fairs can’t bar exhibitors from selling or displaying Confederate flag items

Hwy 105 Flea Market. Image courtesy of accent on ecclectic, via everystockphoto.com.

Hwy 105 Flea Market. Image courtesy of accent on ecclectic, via everystockphoto.com.

The always-lucid and super bright Eugene Volokh rightly points out, “No, state fairs can’t bar exhibitors from selling or displaying Confederate flag items.”

Recent news stories report that Indiana and Kentucky state fairs are barring exhibitors from selling or displaying the Confederate battle flag, or products containing that flag; Ohio seems to have done the same, and other fairs are considering it. But such bans violate the First Amendment.

 

Can You Copyright a Phrase In Neon?

Kelly Mark. I Called Shotgun Infinity When I Was Twelve - 2006 Neon, transformers & acrylic.

Kelly Mark. I Called Shotgun Infinity When I Was Twelve – 2006
Neon, transformers & acrylic.

Apparently, artist Kelly Mark thinks so. But can you? Not sure about Canadian copyright law, but as some of our readers well-know by now, short phrases are most likely not protected by U.S. copyright laws, especially when the arrangement is done in what one could describe as a generic layout and font style. Thoughts?

More on this story here.

 

Daniel Buren Would Like His Art Destroyed. Please Do So.

Buren’s “enormous piece, which is situated in the Place des Terreaux, in Lyon, France, is made up of 69 small fountains with 14 pillars surrounding them. The artwork typifies the geometric grid work that Mr. Buren is famous for. Unfortunately, it’s fallen into disrepair. Fallen so far, in fact, that Mr. Buren wishes the whole thing would be demolished, Cabrini-Green-style.”

Via The Observer.

 

Graffiti Artist Sues Moschino for Copyright Infringement

This is the latest in a still small string of cases in which graffiti artists are asserting their copyright in US courts. Last year, the Italian fashion designer Roberto Cavalli, the movie director Terry Gilliam and the retailer American Eagle Outfitters were all separately sued by street artists, alleging that their art was copied without their permission.

Outlaws asserting their property rights. Agreed?

Via The Art Newspaper.

 
 
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