Friday, June 22, 2018
 

Free Speech

The First Amendment to the United States Constitution is part of the Bill of Rights. The amendment prohibits the Congress from making laws respecting an establishment of religion, impeding the free exercise of religion, infringing on the freedom of speech and infringing on the freedom of the press. In the 20th century, the Supreme Court held that the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment applies the First Amendment to each state, including any local government.

The First Amendment reads:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Why Roseanne’s Firing Is Not a Free-Speech Issue

“The Right of Publicity?A Misunderstood, Misshapen, Bloated Monster”

Can students legally drown out a speaker with whom they disagree?

NY State considering post-mortem right of publicity

A brief overview of right of publicity in art

Lecture: Culture in the Face of Publics

Does removal of “Satanic” murals violate artists’ moral rights?

 
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