Saturday, November 17, 2018
 


Wikileaks: Cryptographic Document Leaking


According to its website, Wikileaks is an uncensorable version of Wikipedia for untraceable mass document leaking and analysis. It combines the protection and anonymity of cutting-edge cryptographic technologies with the transparency and simplicity of a wiki interface.”

Although the exact source of origin is unknown (it’s only point of reference is a 202 Washington, D.C. area code), theories now exist that Wikileaks is a CIA project.

The site adds: “Wikileaks is developing an uncensorable Wikipedia for untraceable mass document leaking and analysis. Our primary interests are oppressive regimes in Asia, the former Soviet bloc, Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East, but we also expect to be of assistance to those in the west who wish to reveal unethical behavior in their own governments and corporations. We aim for maximum political impact; this means our interface is identical to Wikipedia and usable by non-technical people. We have received over 1.2 million documents so far from dissident communities and anonymous sources.”

 

Mexican Drug Cartels Battle It Out on YouTube


Reuters and The Register report that a bloody war between rival Mexican drug gangs has spilled onto YouTube where two competing cartels “taunt each other with blood-soaked slideshows and films of their murder victims.”

Reuters notes that on YouTube “one popular video shows a man being shot in the head” while a “stomach-churning series of photos shows another execution victim, his missing face a mangled mess of flesh”.

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Featured: Railing Opinion: A Call to Art Critics Real Voices: A Name in lieu of Authority, by Irving Sandler by Tyler Rowland

Brooklyn Rail (December 2006/January 2007).

“THANK GOD, SOMEONE CARES, I THOUGHT THAT CURATOR, MEANT ‘TO CARE’ BUT MAYBE THE CRITIC WILL SAVE THE ART WORLD FROM TOTAL ANNIHILATION. ARTISTS AND CRITICS UNITE! A KINSHIP THROUGH CRITICALITY. WE NEED MORE VOICES SCREAMING THE SAME THINGS, NOT LESS SAYING THE SAME OLD SHIT! UNITE TO WRITE AND TAKE BACK ART. FUCK THE MACHINE. DON”T LET OTHERS DICTATE YOUR VOICE AND/OR CAREER. USE YOUR PRIVILEDGE AND POWER TO SPEAK YOUR OWN MIND. CREATE CHANGE>>>NOW! FUCK ANONYMITY. TAKE CLAIM TO YOUR NAME.” >>>TYLER ROWLAND (2006) ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

This was submitted to the Brooklyn Rail and to the Clandestine Construction Company International (CLANCCO) website (http://www.clancco.com/) in January 2007.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

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Interview with Tom Lawson, Dean of CalArts School of Art


This interview took place the glorious sunny afternoon of October 7, 2006, at the Spain Restaurant in Los Angeles, California, hours before the New York Mets swept the Los Angeles Dodgers to win the National League Division Series. The interview covers a wide range of questions: from Lawson’s artistic career, deanship at CalArts, and writing publications, to Lawson’s current thoughts on contemporary art, art pedagogy and the impact of market forces on artistic production.

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Memoirs of a Gusano: Cuba, Private Property and the Punctum

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On Urban Renewal, Saatchi, and Reterritorialized Markets


An interesting week for visual culture, law, and community formation as elucidated by digital and real-property mediums. The New York Times reported on December 18, 2006, on Charles Saatchi’s ever-popular “Stuart,” his online website analogous to the now edificed, MySpace.com. The day before the New York Times also reported on Houston, Texas’ Project Row Houses, a project initiated and run by Rick Lowe.

While Saatchi’s project raises more legal questions than interesting propositions, Project Row Houses manage to invoke and critique both.

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Michael Asher: MoCA Chicago 1979


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For this installation, Asher proposed that the two horizontal rows of aluminum panels on either side of and on the same level as the Bergman Gallery windows should be removed from the facade and placed on an interior wall of the gallery for the duration of the exhibition.

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Arguing that this project “points to the conditions in which architecture and art, as practices, have become irreconcilable,” Asher believes that the only similarity between these two practices is ultimately stylistic.

 
 
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