Wednesday, January 19, 2022
 

“Artist” alters mural to appease audience

According to Artforum, oppressed and aggrieved audience members that called for the destruction of Beau Stanton’s mural included “Christine Y. Kim, associate curator of contemporary art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and Kibum Kim, associate director and head of art business at the Sotheby’s Institute of Art Los Angeles.”

In order to avoid the destruction of his artwork, Stanton, who calls himself an “artist,” has decided to “compromise” by modifying his artwork.

Why bother with moral rights when so-called “artists” are more than willing to do the modifications and destruction all on their own.

Here’s an idea: Why don’t we just create government-run identity committees to which all artists shall submit their ideas for approval, or if rejected, with mandatory changes and edits. For example,

“Dear Mexican, Mexican-American, Latino, Latina, Latinx, and every other brown folk group with direct and/or indirect ties south of the border:

I am an artist who wishes to use the sombrero in my painting, which may or may not be shown, sold and/or auctioned near a Spanish-speaking neighborhood and/or community which may or may not include brown-skinned people. May I have permission to do so? If not, please do e-mail me jpgs instructing me on the proper way to display a sombrero.
Yours, – Artist”

 

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